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Another London Cladding Fire????

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Messy
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Another London Cladding Fire????

Post by Messy » Mon Sep 09, 2019 8:08 am

I know I am sounding like an old record player with a stuck needle, but I am so pleased I am not engaged in residential fire safety any more

Another serious fire involving 100% of a 4 storey timber clad block of flats in south London shows that its not just composite cladding panels that the industry (and public) should be concerned about. With combustible cladding and balconies being responsible for significant & rapid fire spread in many incidents lately, these lovely looking flats had both features.

Residents are reporting today being woken up by neighbours knocking on doors and the LFB are implying it was well alight when they arrived

Whilst my heart goes out to those who lost everything, I can't help feel sympathy for the poor fire risk assessor who signed off the most recent FRA. Despite everyone getting out, he or she will be under the spotlight as the shock subsides and the anger mounts locally.

BBC News
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-49630496

Rightmove photos of a typical flat on these lovely looking estate
https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-fo ... 71984.html

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Re: Another London Cladding Fire????

Post by bernicarey » Mon Sep 09, 2019 11:12 am

I wonder it that Right Move link was to a property in that Block or an adjacent one, as the page is now:
This property has been removed by the agent.
It may be sold or temporarily removed from the market.
It's this aspect of current Fire Alarm systems that has often worried me.
He said fire alarms were going off in the community areas but not in his own flat and he believed the blaze began "on the balconies".
What's the point of Alarms going off in stairways and corridors if they can't be heard in Flats/Apartments ??


I totally agree it's not just Composite Cladding that people should be concerned about.
Architects come up with all these fancy exterior visual designs, including timber balconies and exteriors, but who ensures they are flame resistant, both on installation and after weathering for 'X' years?
www.belvoirsafety.co.uk

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hammer1
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Re: Another London Cladding Fire????

Post by hammer1 » Mon Sep 09, 2019 2:52 pm

Messy wrote:
Mon Sep 09, 2019 8:08 am
I know I am sounding like an old record player with a stuck needle, but I am so pleased I am not engaged in residential fire safety any more

Another serious fire involving 100% of a 4 storey timber clad block of flats in south London shows that its not just composite cladding panels that the industry (and public) should be concerned about. With combustible cladding and balconies being responsible for significant & rapid fire spread in many incidents lately, these lovely looking flats had both features.

Residents are reporting today being woken up by neighbours knocking on doors and the LFB are implying it was well alight when they arrived

Whilst my heart goes out to those who lost everything, I can't help feel sympathy for the poor fire risk assessor who signed off the most recent FRA. Despite everyone getting out, he or she will be under the spotlight as the shock subsides and the anger mounts locally.

BBC News
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-49630496

Rightmove photos of a typical flat on these lovely looking estate
https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-fo ... 71984.html
Not knowing the full SP on this incident, but if build is recent, it is more the construction/pre occupancy process of building regulations that should be scrutinised as should LABC or AI (conflict of interest some might say).

The risk assessor can only work on the Reg 38 info that is handed to them, still to this day this information is nowhere near to the required level. Also type 1 FRAs are very restricted when it comes to build infrastructure (and normally has extensive caveats) - hence why type 3/4 FRA are the only way forward for existing blocks that have potential for concern.
The song goes...{I'm gonna walk down to electric avenue and I'm gonna say ' have you got PAT testing records for all that mate'}

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Re: Another London Cladding Fire????

Post by witsd » Tue Sep 10, 2019 10:36 am

bernicarey wrote:
Mon Sep 09, 2019 11:12 am
It's this aspect of current Fire Alarm systems that has often worried me.
He said fire alarms were going off in the community areas but not in his own flat and he believed the blaze began "on the balconies".
What's the point of Alarms going off in stairways and corridors if they can't be heard in Flats/Apartments ??
This is what I'm still waiting to hear about... Was it stay put, in which case why were common alarms fitted – had they identified additional risks or were there significant risks in common spaces? If it wasn't stay put, why not, and why were the alarms not linked to the flats or otherwise audible?

Also: did the common spaces have windows, or were they affected after most of the flats were?
We often think that when we have completed our study of one we know all about two, because 'two' is 'one and one.' We forget that we still have to make a study of 'and.'

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