We've rebooted our Facebook Group. If groups are your thing, join up and let's make it as amazing and friendly as our forums!

Click here for HSfB's Facebook Group Image

Electronically secured doors - release mechanisms

Discuss all things fire related.

Moderator: Moderators

Post Reply
User avatar
Paul1979
Jnr Member
Jnr Member
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 4:19 pm
Been thanked: 6 times

Electronically secured doors - release mechanisms

Post by Paul1979 » Thu Sep 05, 2019 9:59 am

Hi All,

After some guidance from anyone who has opinions on this really...

Blocks of flats (brand spanking new) have electronic locks (fob activated) for access control purposes. Inside each of the said doors, there is a release button for day to day egress use. The doors are also interfaced with the building fire alarm system which covers communal areas and AOV system. BUT, there is no Type A (BS EN 54-11) manual override.

My understanding was that for a new build (of any occupancy style) electronically fastened doors should comply with BS7273-4. So I am reading section 11.2 [Manual release controls for electronically secured doors and powered sliding doors] which is where I am finding the requirement for a Type A call point which is green, etc.

In addition, the doors fail safe in event of loss of electricity.

Our thoughts were that electronically fastened doors should in the main (with exception of buildings where its unsafe to do so such as prisons, correctional centres, places where mentally unwell occupants are found and may harm themselves or others, etc);

A) Fail safe in event of loss of power
B) Be fitted with Type A manual release (GBGU) which is dual pole (even if there is already a day to day release button)
C) Be interfaced with fire alarm system[/list]

I have come across 2 identical properties (>18m, single stair, etc) within London recently; the first one, the BCO refused to sign off the build until the Type A mechanisms were fitted (in addition to the day to day egress buttons). The second, the BCO advised the Type A mechanisms were not required! So a real lack of consistency....exactly the same build / spec.

Appreciate if an existing building, the FRA would determine if the Type A mechanisms were required, however I assumed that on new buildings, there would be a consistent approach to this?

Anyone with any thoughts / experience on this matter please let me know as we're all a little bit stumped... .scratch

Thanks as always for your time in reading and responding to my silly questions!

User avatar
Paul1979
Jnr Member
Jnr Member
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 4:19 pm
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Electronically secured doors - release mechanisms

Post by Paul1979 » Sat Sep 07, 2019 9:03 am

Bump :)

User avatar
Messy
Grand Shidoshi
Grand Shidoshi
Posts: 3006
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:59 am
Occupation: Ex London Fire Brigade. Now 'retired' and providing bespoke fire safety solutions to a large worldwide portfolio of premises by an employer with long pockets and short arms!
Location: Job based in Central London
Has thanked: 41 times
Been thanked: 65 times

Re: Electronically secured doors - release mechanisms

Post by Messy » Sat Sep 07, 2019 1:21 pm

Thank goodness that I am no longer involved in residential flats as they can be a headache.

I look after buildings where some have a high value security profile. We have hundreds of doors- including final exits - that do not failsafe in a power failure ( no point spending 100s of £1000s on security when an easily induced power failure opens all doors.

None of the doors open when the fire alarm activates (for similar reasons to above)

But ALL electronically locked doors are fitted with a green break glass unit or a mechanical mortise type lock (in a break off security plastic dome)

We test all overrides every 8 weeks

It is absolutely impossible to guarantee a signal from a fire alarm control panel (or local exit button) will work 100% of the time. So we insist they are duplicated by a break glass override fitted to a local supply and our UPS system

Our final exits have power from 2 x separate power company transformers, our building UPS system, a generator and if all else fails, an internal individual UPS which is part of the door

So to answer your question, its likely that the exit button switch is being considered as the local override. This might be suitable, but I would need convincing the arrangement is as good as or better than a break glass override

User avatar
Paul1979
Jnr Member
Jnr Member
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 4:19 pm
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Electronically secured doors - release mechanisms

Post by Paul1979 » Sat Sep 07, 2019 2:52 pm

Thank you Messy, it is indeed a nightmare!

Post Reply

 

Follow us on Twitter Find us on Facebook Find us on on LinkedIn

Terms of Use Privacy Policy