Domestic smoke alarms

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NGC
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Domestic smoke alarms

Post by NGC » Mon Aug 06, 2018 1:53 pm

Hi Guys,
Does anyone have experience of domestic smoke alarms being used in a commercial (retail) premises?
I cant find a straight answer about servicing requirements? Does anyone have any guidance on this?

Thanks in advance. :D .salut
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Messy
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Re: Domestic smoke alarms

Post by Messy » Mon Aug 06, 2018 3:44 pm

Blimey! You are going to have to give a whole shed load of info before I or others can comment.
It's not usual practice to use domestic smoke detection in commercial - non residential premises. But it's not impossible. You just need to justify why a domestic (so called part 6 system) is in place over a commercial system (part 1 system as it complies with BS5839 part 1).

So if you could provide details of the risk that is being mitigated by installing that system (size of building. Means of escape available , occupancy and the use of it) you would be in a better place.

BTW. I assume you mean hard wired 240v linked detectors- or do you mean battery only stand alone units??

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Re: Domestic smoke alarms

Post by bernicarey » Mon Aug 06, 2018 4:34 pm

It really does depend on the premises to a certain degree.
You've stated just
commercial (retail) premises
so if it's a small 'lock-up' shop that only a handful of people can get into, like the traditional 'Corner Shop' or something like in 'Open All Hours' then why not, as it's better than nothing, which is the other likely option.

I once encountered a small industrial unit where there was a battery powered domestic alarm hung on some string from the roof. You could quite literally lower it down on the string to change the battery!! :shock:
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Re: Domestic smoke alarms

Post by Essex » Tue Aug 07, 2018 2:33 am

Almost certainly no.

Domestic smoke detector units would not meet the requirements to warn the public that use the retail premises that they need to evacuate.
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Re: Domestic smoke alarms

Post by Messy » Tue Aug 07, 2018 5:34 am

..... and there we have it ladies and gentleman. This is the wonderful workd of fire safety. Three replies and two different views!! 2 x perhaps and 1 x 8 don't think so.

I am being unfair as all 3 of us are saying it's possible, but only to cover very low risks.

I did a hairdressing salon which had a tanning booth in an inner room. The small salon had no requirement for fire detection other than to cover the means of escape from the inner room

Even then the risk was tiny. Staff would be in the shop 99% of the time so would be able to raise the alarm. But to ensure there would be no issues in the council issuing a special treatment licence, it was agreed a part 6 hardwired domestic smoke detector would be fitted in the access room/shop.

I supplied a rationale in the FRA of risk and cost proportionality as to have a part 1 full panel, manual call points and sounders would have been excessive.

I cannot see any circumstances where I would suggest a battery smoke detector in a retail setting though


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Re: Domestic smoke alarms

Post by hammer1 » Fri Aug 10, 2018 11:32 am

Messy wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 5:34 am
..... and there we have it ladies and gentleman. This is the wonderful workd of fire safety. Three replies and two different views!! 2 x perhaps and 1 x 8 don't think so.

I am being unfair as all 3 of us are saying it's possible, but only to cover very low risks.

I did a hairdressing salon which had a tanning booth in an inner room. The small salon had no requirement for fire detection other than to cover the means of escape from the inner room

Even then the risk was tiny. Staff would be in the shop 99% of the time so would be able to raise the alarm. But to ensure there would be no issues in the council issuing a special treatment licence, it was agreed a part 6 hardwired domestic smoke detector would be fitted in the access room/shop.

I supplied a rationale in the FRA of risk and cost proportionality as to have a part 1 full panel, manual call points and sounders would have been excessive.

I cannot see any circumstances where I would suggest a battery smoke detector in a retail setting though

:lol: :lol: :lol:

And they said moving away from prescriptive guidance would be a good thing eh :lol:

When you say 'domestic' smoke detection, it needs to be clear what that means, battery only Grade F then No No, if Grade D as per BS5839 Part 6 (mains connected. battery back up) and is interlinked with other detectors in retail unit - then that's a maybe.

All depends on location/relevant persons etc etc - If by retail you mean a small stand alone shop with a few rooms front and rear access/egress then yes for sure Grade D it is. You would need to up your game on the testing part and record it, then have an annual service.

If by retail you mean a café under flats in a period building, then No its BS5839 Part 1
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