Mentor advice

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Southeast15
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Mentor advice

Post by Southeast15 » Mon Mar 12, 2018 6:42 pm

Hi All :wave:

I’m hoping some of you may be able to help with a recent predicament. It may also help some others in a similar position to me.

I’m fairly new to a career in H&S but am really enjoying it so far. Now I have more experience I seem to be facing a situation that I’m not sure how to deal with but I’m hoping the experience on here can help.

I visit a number of premises regularly throughout the month, all at least twice to see how they are complying with company procedures/legislation.

The more experience I get, the more I find and I’m now leaving sites with long lists of non conformaties that they either aren’t or don’t have time between visits to close out.

I just feel like a policeman and the sites are resenting my visits .scratch I’m not sure how to turn this around into a more positive experience for me and them. The actions aren’t things I can close out myself easily without just taking off their hands and doing for them or I don’t have the knowledge to close out :?

I’m sure I’m not the first or the last person to come across this and any advice would be great.

Thanks in advance :wave: ./thumbsup..

joaorosa80
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Re: Mentor advice

Post by joaorosa80 » Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:25 pm

Are you briefing with the site manager before you leave?
There is no point to leave 100 NC if nothing happens.
Manage a reasonable target with the site manager and try to engage them in HS.
You can also share the HS supervision with them.

Southeast15
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Re: Mentor advice

Post by Southeast15 » Tue Mar 13, 2018 5:23 am

Thanks for the reply. :)
I always walk with two people from the premises so they know what I’m looking at and why it’s an action. I’d hoped it would help build relationships.

I agree there’s no point leaving long action lists that no one takes any notice of. I just feel that if I notice a briefing, induction, RA missing that I should include it in my report, if I don’t I feel I’m turning a blind eye.
I really want to get them engaged and for me to do more than just write lists. I just don’t know how to turn this around

Thanks

joaorosa80
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Re: Mentor advice

Post by joaorosa80 » Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:10 am

Are you supported in your role by the senior management and do they know about the current issues? Directors tour? Do they happen?
Did you explain the legal consequences (contraventions)?

How about the policies & procedures and job roles?
Collaborative tools to follow up the issues (trello)?

A site visit is a snapshot and you are doing very well appoint what you see, however, you should also engage with the management. Have a look in the HS65/ISO 45001.

stephen1974
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Re: Mentor advice

Post by stephen1974 » Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:22 am

It's easy to see auditors as the enemy because a) you are picking up on things that they have missed that could make them look bad as managers and get them in to trouble, b) you are creating additional work for them and disrupting their normal operation.

Do not try and get around this by doing the work for them as this will lead to them abusing you and leaving things for you to do rather than take responsibility for themselves.

Instead, look to support them. Help give or get them the resources they need to get the job done properly, and fight their corner where necessary, ie if they need equipment but the bosses wont provide it, stand with them rather than the bosses, or if they disagree with a procedure, listen to their concerns and if they are legit, again, stand up for them.

You do have to do a bit of stick and carrot. If you raise issues, they must get corrected or disciplinary action should follow, but you should also do as much as possible to help them do the job, without getting caught in the trap of doing it yourself and letting them off the hook.


Southeast15
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Re: Mentor advice

Post by Southeast15 » Tue Mar 13, 2018 7:23 pm

Hi

Thank you for your comments. Unfortunatly senior management aren’t being particularly supportive and I try to use the preventative method of explaining why we need to do these things rather then if there’s an accident or because the law says so.

I help as much as I can but maybe it’s not enough. It’s a fine line between helping and then finding you’ve done it for them but backing them in certain issues is a good point. I do tow the company line and maybe don’t back them as I could.

We’re lucky and work in a low risk, low accident environment which also has its draw backs as they can’t see the need for all of the requirements, having not been exposed to the issues we are preventing against.

I haven’t heard of trello but will look it up, thanks for the suggestion.

It sounds like it’s just going to be a bit of a learning curve for me and hopefully along the way I can find some middle ground. It’s just a difficult situation but I really appreciate the comments and time you’ve taken to respond.

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grim72
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Re: Mentor advice

Post by grim72 » Wed Mar 14, 2018 12:01 pm

If you can try and manoeuvre the other two to spot issues/suggest solutions instead of you pointing them all out it might help get them to take some ownership and see it through? Being told you're doing something wrong and being told how to do it correctly can rub people up the wrong way and meet resistance (even if they know you are right). Getting someone else to spot the issue for themselves and find a solution whilst praising them can help get things done without the friction.

I guess it depends on the issues and the individuals involved though as to whether this method could/would work.
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