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Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

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zenad
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Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

Post by zenad »

Hi No im not going bonkers, and it is not a joke although i first thought it was yesterday!
i have been asked to provide a risk assessment for a resident to be able to be able to keep a trantula in his room, please could I ask for any advise, ideally we are trying to prove that he can not have it.
Resident is wheelchair bound, and able to communicate his needs, spider is in a small glass cage and is able to climb out, resident is reluctant to put a heavy object on top, also spider fed on crickets, and venomus, althoug hresident says he will be responsible for cleaning out the spider etc
Any help will be gratefully receieved
zena

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Alexis
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Re: Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

Post by Alexis »

:lol: Hi Zenad, nice to see you again. I haven't a clue about this, but one plus for the resident getting to keep the "pet" is that if the tarantula does happen to escape, they are like homing pigeons and will always return home. :)

Sorry for being frivolous, I am sure someone will give you top advice as usual. :)
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Re: Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

Post by mattdurbin »

what is the likely outcome of the escape and biting (or whatever they do) perhaps use the quantitive risk assessment with the 5x5 results, if it's death and the escape is likely then it'll prove that he can't have it.
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Re: Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

Post by Siblo »

Hi Zenad,

My Mrs has afriend who works in an exotic pet shop, she (her friend) also has pet spiders at home, I could pass you her email if you think it might help to identify the risks. Just a chat with an expert might aleviate some of your fears, (or scare the pants off you!)

If memory serves me well, your in Manchester area so may be able to set up a look see aswell.

PM me if you need this help

Siblo

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Re: Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

Post by ddlh »

Ask your local authority what their rules are as per keeping pets. They may have a ban on nasties like this?

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Re: Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

Post by mistersmith »

Hi There

My family has a history of keeping exotic pets and if it is a Mexican red knee tarantula it would be very rare for it to bite and even if it did it would cause very little harm except to perhaps very young children or perhaps exremely infirm people.

I would certainy discouage anybody from keeping one without a lid on for a couple of reasons

1. Because of other peoples fear of spiders
2. Because of harm to the spider.

The crickets can be kept in a fridge and it makes them very docile and easy to feed to the spider. Thee spiders shed on average once per year and when we had our first one we thought it had given birth but what happens with a tarntula is that it splits its back and effectively climbs out of the old shell (they are exoskeletal) and it looks as though there are 2 of them.

In my humble opinionthere is nothing o worry about. I am also an amateur herpatologist so if any of themwant to keep snakes, ask away :-)
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Phil
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Re: Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

Post by Phil »

From what I remember of my phase of wanting a tarantula the bites, though venomous, are no worse than a bee sting so I am told but the main advice I got was that some Tarantulas shed fine hairs with which plays havoc with anyone who has breathing difficulties and can cause rashes. Both the bite and the hairs can also cause allergic reactions including anaphylactic shock.

I opted for a snake in the end.
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Re: Trantula Risk assessment Help Please

Post by Ashanti »

My son has a collection of exotic pets, snakes, scorpion, bearded dragons, gheckos etc. No spiders but the shop where we get our live food keeps plenty of them. I have never heard of one being allowed to roam free and this would be more dangerous for the spider than any resident or visitor. It depends on the type of tarantula but most will need some form of permanent heat source and they can be squashed very easily. Most but not all breeds are very reluctant to waste a poisonous bite on non food items and throwing hairs is a last resort defensive action. As Phil says the bites in general are no worse than a bee sting but that does vary by the type. If the tarantula is kept in a secured suitable container on a heat mat/cable then there should be no problem and it is certainly not a significant hazard. Crickets can usually escape through the smallest gaps and would be out of an open container within seconds. They will eventually die if they escape but the spider will be very hungry. If you want to discourage your tenant keeping a tarantula as a pet I would go down the line that the person does not sound as if they know what they are doing with one if they allow it to roam freely and not trying to say that it is a dangerous animal.

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